For as highly-touted and talented as Corey Seager is, he is still human and prone to the same slumps some of the game’s greatest players endured in their respective careers.

Seager joined the Los Angeles Dodgers High-A Rancho Cucamonga in August of last season and struggled at the plate after hitting .309 with 12 home runs and 57 RBIs at the Low-A level. Matters didn’t get any better for Seager in the Arizona Fall League as he hit .181 with the Glendale Desert Dogs.

While it was a frustrating end to the 2013 season, Seager called it a learning experience, via Jim Callis of MLB.com:

When I struggled, that was the first time I ever struggled, so I had to really figure out myself,” Seager said. “It helped me understand what I need to do to continue my success and continue not to hit those low patches all the time. When I do hit them, I know how to fix them.”

Seager began 2014 with the Quakes and looked nothing like the player who hit .160 in 27 games in his first experience in High-A ball. Instead, the shortstop hit .352/.411/.633 with 18 home runs and 70 RBIs.

Seager’s performance resulted in a July promotion to Double-A, where the success continued. Prior to joining the Lookouts, Seager participated in the Futures Game alongside Dodgers’ pitching prospect Julio Urias.

Along with being moved up, Seager’s play with the Quakes earned him California Pacific League MVP honors and he was named a co-winner for the Dodgers’ Branch Rickey Award, which recognizes the top Minor League player.

Adding to how impressive Seager has been for the Dodgers’ Minor League affiliates is he’s played against competition much older than him. At only 20-years-old, Seager has been labeled a future cornerstone for the Dodgers.

While Seager appears to be a minimum of two seasons away from joining the Dodgers on a full-time basis, he’s currently with the Desert Dogs looking to atone for his lackluster play from a year go.
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About The Author

Matt is a journalist from Whittier, California. A Cal State Long Beach graduate, Matthew occasionally contributes to Lakers Nation, and previously served as the lead editor and digital strategist at Dodgers Nation, and the co-editor and lead writer at Reign of Troy, where he covered USC Football. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mmoreno1015

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