Over the last few years the Los Angeles Dodgers have turned their farm system into one of the best in baseball, led by three of baseball’s top prospects in 21-year-old Corey Seager and 23-year-old Joc Pederson, both of whom are now finding success in the Majors, and 19-year-old Julio Urias.

A lot of that can be attributed to the scouting department for drafting or signing the talented players, but it can also be a testament to the Minor League coaches for helping develop the young players.

Despite the fine work that has been done in developing prospects, the Dodgers cut ties with several of their Minor League coaches according to Ken Gurnick of MLB.com:

Among the 10 whose contracts will not be renewed are Triple-A Oklahoma City manager Damon Berryhill, who was named manager of the year in the Pacific Coast League earlier this month, and Double-A Tulsa manager Razor Shines. In addition to Berryhill and Shines, Oklahoma City hitting coach Franklin Stubbs, Great Lakes pitching coach Glenn Dishman, Arizona Rookie League manager Jack McDowell, instructor Rick Rhoden, Great Lakes coach Angel Sanchez, Great Lakes hitting coach Jay Gibbons, Ogden hitting coach Darryl Brinkley and instructor Erik Bedard will not be retained.

For Berryhill in particular, this comes just one month after he was named Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year with Triple-A Oklahoma City.

The 51-year-old manager spent seven seasons as a manager in the Dodgers’ Minor League system. He debuted with rookie-level Ogden in 2009, where he guided the Raptors to four postseason appearances over five years, then moved on to manage Triple-A Albuquerque in 2014.

This season Berryhill led OKC to the best record in franchise history, though they were then swept out of the first round of the playoffs; albeit without a few key contributors who had joined the Dodgers.

Double-A Tulsa manager Razor Shines spent 10 seasons with Dodgers organization, managing the Double-A team for the last two. Franklin Stubbs spent six season in the organization as a hitting coach, while Jack McDowell, rookie-level Arizona League manager, was let got after just two seasons with Dodgers.

Low-A Great Lakes pitching coach Glenn Dishman, who was the longest tenured coach to be let go, spent 11 season in the Dodgers organization. The moves come nearly one month after the front office also made sweeping changes in the international scouting department.

Los Angeles parted ways with a significant amount of members from the department including Patrick Guerrero, the Dodgers’ scouting coordinator in Latin America. The front office has yet to name any replacements for various the positions that are now vacant.

About The Author

Daniel Starkand is a senior at Chapman University majoring in journalism and minoring in broadcast journalism. He grew up in Burbank, CA. He played baseball at Burbank High and his first year at Chapman. He also writes for The Panther newspaper.

3 Responses

  1. mvs

    Wow, this seems strange. Why do you let some of these people go after obvious success????

    Reply
  2. movonup

    It would take an act of journalism to suss out as to the reasons why Dodgers management let so many go. Unfortunately for the reader, we’ll probably never know. But… phenomenal job to D.N. for reporting the act of the firing, for its not that easy to get all those names correct…good job!

    Reply

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