It’s ironic the city of stars hasn’t hosted the largest gathering of MLB stars in almost four decades.

The Cleveland Indians officially announced today they will host the 2019 All-Star Game. Miami and Washington D.C. will host the next two.

Staples Center hosts the 2017 NHL All-Star extravaganza, but Dodger Stadium has been left out to dry despite north of $150 million in renovations over three decades.

1980 is a long stretch without an All-Star game in Los Angeles – the city that consistently leads the Majors in attendance. Not only will every city have hosted the event in that span, but Cincinnati, San Diego, Cleveland, Anaheim, Minneapolis, Houston, Chicago, Cleveland and San Francisco have hosted multiple occasions. Then one has to account for the upcoming new stadiums in Arlington and Atlanta, among others, hosting in the coming years. So what’s the deal in L.A.?

The Dodgers have been vying to host the party for a while. Commissioner Rob Manfred told the L.A. Daily News in 2015 that the drought isn’t forgotten in MLB minds.

“The Dodgers, and Stan in particular, have made clear their interest in having an All-Star game,” Manfred said. “We’re now committed out through ’18. We’re going to start looking at ’19, ’20 and ’21 in the next few months. I understand that it’s been a very long time since we’ve been in L.A., and that’s an important factor in their favor.”

So with 2019 covered, is Dodger Stadium up for 2020 or 2021? It’d certainly be appropriate. The Dodgers have a flashy ownership – headlined by former Lakers star Magic Johnson – that’s produced nothing but success since its arrival. The Dodgers are one of the flagship franchises of the sport and in one of the nation’s most desirable locations – not to mention all the marketing opportunities for the game, in addition to recruiting celebrities to take part.

After 37 years, the wait may not be too much longer.

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About The Author

News Desk

Gabe Burns is an award-winning journalist. He serves as a reporter and editor at the DodgersNation news desk. He additionally works as editor-in-chief of The Spectator, Valdosta State University's student paper. Gabe's work has been featured on a number of platforms, including Draft Breakdown and Pro Football Spot. His byline has been cited in media such as the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune. Aside from covering Dodgers baseball, Gabe enjoys watching the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Orlando Magic and Tampa Bay Lightning. He can be followed on Twitter at @GabeBurns_DN.

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