Pete Rose is the all-time leader in hits, games played, plate appearances, and at-bats. He’s a former Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player. He’s also a three-time world champion and a World Series MVP. But Los Angeles Dodgers announcer Vin Scully still thinks Rose shouldn’t be put in the Hall of Fame.

Then again, Scully isn’t alone in that regard. Major League Baseball has yet to lift the lifetime ban that was implemented in 1989, so those people wanting Rose to get into the Hall will have to wait until he’s formally reinstated, but that doesn’t seem as if it will be coming anytime soon. Still, Scully wouldn’t put him in.


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Courtesy of the Associated Press, via ESPN dot com:

“I wouldn’t,” Scully said. “Should he be in? He should be. But by his own hand, he locked the door and kept himself outside.”

It’s hard to argue with the logic at play here. Rose did sort of keep himself outside by accepting the lifetime ban due to his gambling on the game when he happened to be a manager of the Cincinnati Reds. Yet, at the same time, the Hall of Fame does seem like it’s missing something substantial.

When the Hall has players in there who admitted to cheating or played in an era that was prone to cheating, it leads you to wonder why Rose isn’t actually in there with him. They could probably even put in a new wing of the Hall where it highlights those who disparaged the game.

The cool thing is that Scully does say Rose should be in, and he is right that this is on Rose for even being in this situation where his Hall of Fame enshrinement is a pipe dream rather than a reality. Rose is 74 now, and it’s unlikely he gets reinstated and elected anytime soon.

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About The Author

Justin Russo is a 30-year old sports enthusiast who dabbles in all forms of sports talk. Whether that talk revolves around the NBA, NCAA, NFL, NHL, MLB, or other leagues, he has an opinion. He works as a writer for Warriors World, and was formerly a writer and editor for ClipsNation on the SB Nation network. He also is the Editor-in-chief for But The Game Is On: The Beat.

11 Responses

  1. Tmaxster

    Well I have to disagree with an Icon. I find many of the “old Crew” want to keep Rose out. The HOF is not a comment on the moral fiber of the ball players. Mantle and many others were alcoholics.. Several beat their wives and Cobb was according to reports one of the nastiest humans to ever play the game. 
    Let the HOF be dependent on their baseball stats and not on their humanity. If you are going to judge on their “What kind of People are they” I suggest they begin to pull guys out starting with Cobb….

    Reply
  2. silverattollo

    I am reposting what has been my response for several years > > > >
    I’m not sure why sportswriters and
    whining fans do not understand the reason Pete Rose is banned from the Hall of
    Fame.
    It’s not about “issues of
    character”. (Even though Pete has demonstrated
    some deficits throughout). There has indeed been a rogue’s gallery of truly
    unlikable – if not detestable – players in MLB and some in the HOF.
    It’s not about the “sin”
    of gambling. Baseball’s gambling prohibition is
    not about rights or wrongs in a judgmental moralistic sense.
    It’s not about egos. Even if there are plenty of egos to go around in this
    situation (perhaps the largest being Pete’s), the ban is something far more
    objective and non-personal.
    It’s about assuring the outcome of the game is not
    predetermined. The 10 yr. old boy with the Giant
    or the Dodger or the Reds cap – the guy with the Derek Jeter jersey – the
    buddies at the sports bar – the old man listening on his Philco . . . . they
    all deserve to be assured that the outcome of the game they so love will ONLY
    be determined by athletic skill, human error and limitations, the bounce of the
    ball, the angle of the sun, and the tricks of the wind.
    Did Pete Rose fix games? I sure don’t think so. Did the
    amount he had bet on any single game in the context of his debts and life
    circumstances effect his managerial decisions? Only Pete knows for sure. He has
    said he only bet on his own team to win. The same amount every day? How about
    those days against Ryan, Carlton or Gooden? More when he started Browning? Ride
    Dibble as hard as he could when a big bet was on the line? There has been much
    analysis and criticism of his handling of his bullpen and his starting pitching
    in those seasons. Hard to believe that the huge appetite for gambling in very
    large numbers that Pete had – and continues to display to this day – did not
    affect his decisions when deep in debt and a big bet on the line during a tie
    game in the 7th inning.
    But regardless of those counterpoints to the “only bet
    on his own team” claim – – it all comes back to the THE significant point.
    Baseball’s prohibition on gambling in Rule 21 is to assure there is no
    predetermined outcome. Only Pete knows if his dugout decisions impacted the
    outcome of any game for his personal financial benefit. It is the sole reason
    for the rule. Pete knew the rule. Pete broke the rule.
    Please think more than twice before
    jumping back on the “Pete Rose deserves to be in the Hall of Fame”
    bandwagon.

    Reply
  3. Tmaxster

    silverattollo Great reasoning for why to keep him out. I do not buy it… Either put him in the Hall or stop pretending it is for baseball achievement on the field. Also I say put in Sosa, McGuire and the rest of that era if their stats deserve it.
    McGuire and Sosa brought baseball back from the strike. For that alone they deserve to be in the Hall….

    If it is for baseball achievement on the field then put them in. Otherwise call it something else Hall of Fame for Nice Guys/Model Citizens that just happen to be Great Baseball Players….

    Reply
  4. robert20156h

    silverattollo I totally agree with you. I have always loved Rose’s all out kind of play. No matter that they challenged the Dodgers consistently during the seventies and eighties. But he knew the rule as everyone else did. I do think that when his father passed, he lost his moral compass. During his investigation I knew in my heart, plus what they had essembled, he was guilty. I wanted so bad for him to just admit to it. Ask ourselves what may have happened if he did? People are very forgiving when we own up to our mistakes. His own teammates don’t believe that he should be in. He was arrogant and thought that he had accomplished so much that no one could bring and keep him down. Fate Vincent blamed Rose for Bart Giamatti’s death, whether fair or unfair, I believe that succeeding Comissioners hang to that belief that stress led to his death. Then to top it off, for money he admits to it in a book. And to add the steroid users to the HOF, I say to those, are you kidding me?

    Reply
  5. Tmaxster

    robert20156h silverattollo No not kidding…. Remember the times? Baseball was coming off of a lost year and terrible strike. People were fed up with Baseball. The sport was seen in a very negative light…
    And then McGuire and Sosa start hitting HR’s and it becomes can’t miss TV.. Everyone was following baseball it brought it back to the National Consciousness and into a Positive light…
    I think for just that Sosa and McGuire should be in the Hall…I do not care about steroids hell I take steroids when I have a Chest infection. I was having an issue and they put me on steroids for a year… Somehow I did not all of a sudden hit a baseball 450 or a golf ball either for that matter LOL…

    Reply
  6. robert20156h

    Tmaxster robert20156h silverattollo Do you suppose  McGuire and Sosa took them for medical reasons. Well I wonder why baseball and football banned them. You say that it doesn’t add or help these users. Ok, have you ever heard of Tony Mandrich?

    Reply
  7. Tmaxster

    robert20156h Tmaxster silverattollo Yes I have heard of him. Apples and Oranges comparison. Mandrich was never a great pro player he wa sjust a side of beef.. . McGuire was a great hitter without any help. He was amazing in College. Sosa was a very good hitter. As I live on the West Coast I have seen quite a few games through the years., Barry Bonds was probably the best hitter I have ever seen. When young I saw Mays, Mantle and Snider.
    On a side note Trout is really special… If you haven’t watched him play I suggest you buy a seat and just watch him. He is a sure fire HOF candidate.. 

    Many of these guys Bonds, McGuire took the steroids by Trainers suggesting them to get over an injury and then felt better and continued. I do not care  they are on Testosterone… Hit the Damn Ball… 
    I would pay good money to see another Sosa McGuire HR race… I do not care if they were on steroids.. Get real… Many athletes attempt to take supplements to help them recover. Baseball is a very very long drag of a season…

    Reply
  8. robert20156h

    Tmaxster robert20156h silverattollo I also saw Mantle Mays and Aaron, but not Snider. You bring solid points, and I respect  your view, but i’m a conservative baseball fan and I view the above players as true heroes. Mantle played with all types of injuries, and so did others in that era. Baseball has always been about statistics. Bonds would have been a HOF before he used them. Ken Griffey Jr, was the only player that was his equal, but now is more respected. Now because of them, statistics mean nothing. Regardless of numbers, I still consider Aarons as all time HR leader.

    Reply
  9. Tmaxster

    robert20156h Tmaxster silverattollo This is one of the great things about baseball. We get to disagree about players, stats etc. But I understand and respect your point of view and you make a great case. 
    I forgot to mention Aaron yes another great hitter. The man was a special person to be able to perform with some people making ignorant racist comments about him and his breaking of Ruth’s record. The incredible thing about Aaron is he was so smooth about it. I am sure he was churning inside but very calm great interviews. Truly a special player and person. 
    One point Mantle was a horrible drunk and not a good guy off the field. These days they would suspend him from baseball…. 
    But he was one of the great players ever. 
    I think of Trout as someone Mantle like…

    Reply
  10. robert20156h

    Tmaxster robert20156h silverattollo Great debate TM. You’re right about Aaron, during his career he just beat you without fanfare. He went about his business quietly, some what like Clemente. That’s why I have such fond memories of that era. And yes, Trout is old school to me. Such as the above-mentioned.

    Reply

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