A man by the name of Stanley Anderson sent out a challenge to baseball players everywhere. If you think you can hit a pitch from 17-feet away, show him. He can do that. Anderson estimates that the pitch travels upwards of 250 miles per hour considering the lack of distance the pitch has to actually traverse before it gets to the bat. Well, a couple players for the Los Angeles Dodgers responded.

The two players who responded were third baseman Justin Turner and utility player Kiké Hernandez. In fact, Turner posted a video of Hernandez attempting the challenge himself, and it was quite a sight to behold. Hernandez stood a few feet away from someone throwing the balls underhanded at a steady speed to him, and he just ripped the pitches.

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From Hernandez’s personal twitter account:

As you can see, Hernandez wasted no time in accepting Anderson’s challenge. The reason for the 266 MPH hashtag is because that’s what Anderson said the actual speed of the pitches are due to the close proximity of the pitching machine to the batter. Well, Hernandez got his rips in, and Justin Turner was there to film all of it as it happened.

From Turner’s official twitter account:

Now, to be fair, that isn’t anywhere close to 266 miles per hour, but it is still pretty impressive considering how close the pitcher is to Hernandez as the underhanded toss comes in. We all love to think we can do something like this, but not all of us can. At least, not with the same batted ball speed that Hernandez is generating when he hits them.

No word on when Stanley Anderson and Kiké Hernandez will have their big showdown in person, but it’d be pretty fantastic to watch. Anderson is doing something that seems almost impossible to do, and Hernandez attempted to duplicate it. It’s going to be fun watching other Major League Baseball stars give this challenge a go.

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About The Author

Justin Russo is a 30-year old sports enthusiast who dabbles in all forms of sports talk. Whether that talk revolves around the NBA, NCAA, NFL, NHL, MLB, or other leagues, he has an opinion. He works as a writer for Warriors World, and was formerly a writer and editor for ClipsNation on the SB Nation network. He also is the Editor-in-chief for But The Game Is On: The Beat.

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