One day after it was announced Vin Scully would return for the 2016 season, a press conference was scheduled for the Hall of Fame broadcaster to discuss the news that was music to the city of Los Angeles’ ears.

Walking into a room packed full of media, Scully humbly moaned and asked why such a large turn out only for himself, along with thanking those in attendance. After an opening statement explaining what factored into his decision to spend a 67th season season behind the microphone for the Dodgers, Scully delivered the news many knew was one day coming, but didn’t want to hear.

The 2016 season in all likelihood will be his last as announcer. “I would say realistically, and I don’t want any headlines, I would say dear God, if you give me next year, I’ll hang it up,” Scully said. With humility he carried on, offering reassurance life and the franchise would successfully move forward without him.

“I saw Mel Allen leave the Yankees, I saw Red Barber leave the Dodgers, I saw Russ Hodges leave the Giants, Harry Caray leave the Cubs and Joe Buck leave the Cardinals,” Scully said. “And you know what? Not one of the those teams missed a game.

“They kept on playing and the fans kept on going. And I will just move along where they are, and be very happy and privileged to be in that company. I know I can be replaced. They’ve all come and gone, and I will join them some day.”

By revealing next season will likely be his last as announcer of the Dodgers, Scully has invariably established an expectation for a well-deserved farewell tour. Though, true to form, that isn’t something he’s interested in. “I don’t want that [farewell tour],” he said.

“The last thing I would want is to have one of these glorified goodbyes. I’d have been thrilled if they announced I was coming back in the [game] notes. That would’ve been plenty for me.”

While the end may be near for the voice that’s synonymous with the Dodgers franchise, Scully certainly will give this remaining season and the next everything he has. “I don’t know poetry at all but if there is one little bit of poetry that I’ve always remembered, it’s the line from Dylan Thomas,” he said.

“‘Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.’ I guess in a way that’s what I’m doing. I’m raging against the dying of my career, which has to be around the corner now. But at least for the God-given time I have left, I’ll be raging.”

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About The Author

Matt is a journalist from Whittier, California. A Cal State Long Beach graduate, Matthew occasionally contributes to Lakers Nation, and previously served as the lead editor and digital strategist at Dodgers Nation, and the co-editor and lead writer at Reign of Troy, where he covered USC Football. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mmoreno1015

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