Carl Crawford was an immense disappointment in his L.A. tenure. That time may be the final memory of Crawford’s career.

Crawford is likely retiring, according to Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe, who cites his information from a Dodgers source. The 35-year old was cut from the Dodgers on June 13. He had $35 million remaining on his contract through 2017.

“According to one Dodgers official, Crawford has pretty much called it a career. There was some thought he might try to make a comeback, but it appears he’s had enough at age 35.”

A four-time All-Star, Crawford became one of the game’s brightest young stars on the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. He took part in their ascension to the franchise’s first taste of relevancy before signing a seven-year, $142 million dollar deal with Boston, becoming the first player under John Henry’s ownership to receive a commitment that long.

Things went south for Crawford with the Red Sox. After often taking heat from the always adoring Boston media, he was packaged with Adrian Gonzalez, Nick Punto and Josh Beckett to Southern California in the infamous salary dump of 2012. Boston gained around $250 million in salary relief, while the Dodgers showed all of baseball the financial power they possessed.

Crawford’s average WAR since signing in Boston was 1.2 (he averaged 6.8 per season in Tampa Bay). He was frequently injured and his bat was largely underwhelming. Crawford was hitting .185 in 30 games before being designated for assignment.

His career would finish with a .290 average, 766 RBI and 480 steals. But in Los Angeles, he won’t be remembered for a the first half of his 15-year run, but instead as a financial albatross necessitated to obtain fan-favorite Gonzalez.

The Dodgers continue searching for a second baseman

About The Author

News Desk

Gabe Burns is an award-winning journalist. He serves as a reporter and editor at the DodgersNation news desk. He additionally works as editor-in-chief of The Spectator, Valdosta State University's student paper. Gabe's work has been featured on a number of platforms, including Draft Breakdown and Pro Football Spot. His byline has been cited in media such as the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune. Aside from covering Dodgers baseball, Gabe enjoys watching the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Orlando Magic and Tampa Bay Lightning. He can be followed on Twitter at @GabeBurns_DN.

2 Responses

  1. Danielsocal

    If Mr. Crawford retired right now would that negate the remaining year of his contract and save us the money? If not,I’d put him to work dow on the farm someplace, hitting or baserunning instructor at least.

    Reply

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