Integrating instant replay into MLB this season hasn’t been an easy feat. At times, the replay reviews have taken too long or they’ve casted more doubt on the on-field call rather than clarify it, among other issues.

The Los Angeles Dodgers have had their share of struggles with instant replay, but they’ve also benefitted from its use. During Tuesday’s game with the Arizona Diamondbacks, the Dodgers found themselves on the right side of replay; winning two of three calls manager Don Mattingly protested.

While Mattingly was certainly acting within his rights, ESPN LA’s Mark Saxon reported the umpires grew agitated when the Dodger manager asked for his third and final replay of the night:

The Dodgers first challenge came on an A.J. Ellis single in the fourth inning that resulted in Carl Crawford being called out at home plate in his attempt to score from second base; Mattingly asked for a crew-chief review to determine if Rule 7.13, which banned catchers from blocking the plate, was violated.

During the review, it was determined Diamondbacks catcher Miguel Montero tagged Crawford on the shoulder with his glove while the ball remained separated and in his right (bare) hand, thus leading to the call being overturned.

The next batter, Mattingly then challenged a call at first base on Roberto Hernandez’s bunt attempt in which the Dodger pitcher was initially ruled out and that was also overturned. Mattingly’s final challenge came an inning later (fifth) with the Dodgers leading 8-2.

David Peralta slid into second base and one angle suggested he came completely off the bag while Hanley Ramirez applied the tag. Losing their final challenge didn’t hurt the Dodgers as the Diamondbacks failed to score any runs during the inning.

The Dodgers had scored two runs in the fourth prior to their two challenges, which led to four more runs. Mattingly acknowledged some of the challenges that have come with utilizing instant replay, but believes the system will improve moving forward.
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About The Author

Matt is a journalist from Whittier, California. A Cal State Long Beach graduate, Matthew occasionally contributes to Lakers Nation, and previously served as the lead editor and digital strategist at Dodgers Nation, and the co-editor and lead writer at Reign of Troy, where he covered USC Football. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mmoreno1015

8 Responses

  1. Joanne M

    Then they should do their job right. I don’t get paid half as much as they do and I have to do mine right to make a living. So sick of the Umpires and their snivelling. I believe all three replays went Mattingly’s way. Just makes them look bad.

    Reply
  2. Neil

    I’ve seen several instances where it appears early in a game an ump will slowly and deliberately make an out call on a close play which initiates a challenge, simply because the ump is unsure of his own judgement. The replay system flat out sucks. It should not be used at all unless all four (or six) umpires agree to use it on homerun calls, plate calls or a most egregious call (e.i., Jim Joyce’s Armando Gallaraga blown perfect game mistake). Line judging, the bang-bang plays, tags on steal attempts, that’s just overdoing it.

    Reply
  3. Michael Norris

    My comment is this…..they got one out of the 3 right….that’s pretty bad percentage…..get the calls right the first time and this won’t happen

    Reply
  4. aj

    I’m not gonna sit here and say the umpires need to do their job right, some calls are pretty tuff. I am however happy to see this change, I can’t tell you how many times I wish they would have gone back to a replay because of a bad call.

    Reply
  5. Aaron P

    If they don’t like doing their job they can get a different one. Quit whining babies.

    Reply
  6. Heidi

    The catcher in the home plate out was in the wrong. He shouldn’t have had the ball in his hand then used his glove to tag. That was a tough call for the ump. I’m glad to see the reviews. Good for Mattingly.

    Reply

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