Juan Pierre

After a 14-year career with over 2,000 hits and more than 600 stolen bases, Juan Pierre retired on Friday. Pierre broke into the Majors with the Colorado Rockies in 2000 and spent the first three years of his career with the club.

The 37-year-old, who didn’t play last season, confirmed the news late Friday morning on his Twitter account:

After three years with the Rockies, he was traded to the Marlins organization in 2003, where he logged five-consecutive seasons of playing all 162 games. Included in that stretch was Pierre starting in center field for the Marlins’ World Series team in 2003.

That season, Pierre hit .305/.361/.373 and stole 65 bases, then was a catalyst in the six games of the World Series against the New York Yankees, batting .333 (7-for-21) with five walks, two doubles, one stolen base and three RBIs.

Pierre’s career with the Dodgers began in 2007 when he signed a five-year, $44 million contract that never quite panned out. Over his three years with the Dodgers, Pierre hit .294/.339/.357 and stole 134 bases in 426 games played.

Over his 14-year career, Pierre had four seasons of at least 200 hits and 45 stolen bases, which ranks second in MLB history behind only Ty Cobb, who accomplished the feat seven times.

Pierre marks the second former Dodger who’s retired in as many days, joining Mark Ellis; the two never played in Los Angeles together.

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About The Author

Matt is a journalist from Whittier, California. A Cal State Long Beach graduate, Matthew occasionally contributes to Lakers Nation, and previously served as the lead editor and digital strategist at Dodgers Nation, and the co-editor and lead writer at Reign of Troy, where he covered USC Football. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mmoreno1015

One Response

  1. Chris Conway

    Juan is the man, I loved watching him play in blue. We did him a disservice benching him but Manny was Manny and there wasn’t much of a choice about it. One of the hardest working ball players of my generation.

    Reply

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