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Jon Soo Hoo, Los Angeles Dodgers

Jon Soo Hoo, Los Angeles Dodgers

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The Los Angeles Dodgers played their last Cactus League game at Camelback Ranch against their neighbors, the Chicago White Sox. Right-hander Joe Wieland, who is a candidate to replace the injured Hyun-Jin Ryu in the starting rotation to start the season, made his first start of the spring. He was opposed by the White Sox top prospect, left-hander Carlos Rodon.

J.B. Shuck led off the game with a single up the middle, but was quickly erased attempting to steal second. Wieland gave up another single to Jose Abreu, which was sandwiched by two fly outs to end the inning without allowing a run. Yasiel Puig put his speed on display in the bottom of the first. After hitting an infield single over the head of Rodon, he stole second, evading Alexei Ramirez’s tag. The Dodgers were unable to score him though.

Wieland gave up a lead off single to start the second, but then got two fly outs and a strike out to end the inning. With two outs in the bottom of the second, Rodon hit Andre Ethier on the right elbow causing Ethier to leave the game. Wieland flied out to end the inning, stranding a pair of runners.

Back-to-back bloopers put runners at second and third for the White Sox with no outs in the third. A sacrifice fly by Melky Cabrera brought home the first run of the game. Abreu then hit an RBI double down the left field line to give the White Sox a 2-0 lead midway through three. The Dodger offense was unable to get anything going.

With two outs and a runner on first in the top of the fourth, Geovany Soto hit a single to right. Connor Gillaspie, who was the runner on first, tried to test Puig’s arm by taking third. Puig did to him what he’s done to so many others, gunning him out at third to end the inning.

Rodon continued to impress in the bottom of the fourth. He gave up a one-out walk to Yasmani Grandal, but nothing else. Wieland gave up a two-out double to Abreu, his third hit of the day, in the top of the fifth. He was able to get a groundout to end the inning, also ending his day. Wieland threw five innings, giving up nine hits and two runs.

CONTINUE READING: Would the offense be able to put runs on the board?

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About The Author

Daniel Starkand is a senior at Chapman University majoring in journalism and minoring in broadcast journalism. He grew up in Burbank, CA. He played baseball at Burbank High and his first year at Chapman. He also writes for The Panther newspaper.

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