in

Dodgers: A Quick Look at the Off-Season Renovation at Dodger Stadium

Short but sweet peak at Blue Heaven on earth.

Just over one month ago the Dodgers made a shocking early exit from the playoffs after a 7-3 loss to the eventual World Series champion Washington Nationals. While sadness, anger, and just about every emotion in between afflicted Dodger fans, at least one person may have seen the silver lining in the early exodus.

In July, the Dodgers announced a $100 million off-season renovation plan for Dodger Stadium. Moreover, Senior Vice President of Planning and Development Janet Marie Smith likely let out a small sigh of relief after the club played its last game on October 9, which provided about three additional weeks to complete the heavy undertaking.

While it may not be much, I took a moment to see how far the demolition phase has advanced in 32 days (give or take) while at the stadium on Monday.

If you missed our earlier reaction to the renovation plans, it was covered in this video.

Of course, these stadium upgrades are in preparation for the 2020 MLB All-Star game, which will be hosted in Los Angeles for the first time since 1981.

Dodger Stadium last underwent a facelift in 2014, which featured new HD video boards, a major clubhouse overhaul, and an upgraded sound system, among many other improvements. Janet Marie Smith — who will be inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame next year — oversaw that renovation as well.

Despite some recent community pushback, things seem to be coming along (or coming apart) at Dodger Stadium on schedule.

Written by Clint Pasillas

Clint is the lead editor of Dodgers Nation, and a host and analyst on Dodgers Nation's own Blue Heaven podcast live stream.

He's been writing, blogging, and podcasting Dodgers since about 2008. He was there for Nomar, Greg Maddux, and Blake DeWitt, and he'll be there for Walker Buehler, Alex Verdugo, Dustin May, and any Dodgers of the future.

He's also a sandwich enthusiast, a consummate athlete, and a friend.

8 Comments

Leave a Reply
  1. Does this mean that you can actually go around the entire stadium or still be restricted to your area? What I’m try to say is if you get a reserve ticket can you only visit the reserve section, and the top deck still?..always thought this was the most ridiculous thing

  2. I would love nothing more than for attendance to plummet right in time for their big renovation year

  3. Making The Dodger Stadium experience even better! The only drawback is knowing McCourt still getting my money every time I park my car!

  4. Rich S….Right on!! It’s ridiculous for sure and it pisses me off as well every time I pay for parking. On another note, they should tear out the entire outfield pavilion, raise the whole profile or elevation and construct some decent seating. Take a look at other stadiums in MLB. Ours could be as good or better than the rest by just re-configuring the outfield seating. Probably will never happen due to construction time constraints before the start of next season.

    • No, that what makes Dodger Stadium unique by it’s retro design and seating. Leave the pavillions alone. Renovate them, but do not replace them. Why should we look like other stadiums?? Chavez Ravine has always been unique. Leave it alone.

  5. What the stadium needs is a child care area. I’ve been to several games throughout the years and mothers, dads dont enjoy the games because of little babies, toddlers move in seats, cry, and disturb others that are watching, or trying to watch game!
    I’m a retired teacher, but also a childcare giver..I understand everything that would be involved to do this. I also know how the fans would agree.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Dodgers

Dodgers Off-Season: Explaining MLB’s General Manager Meetings

Dodgers Rookies Receive Zero Votes for Rookie of the Year