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Dodgers: Alex Verdugo Stunned By NLDS Exit; Last Man Standing

Pride and pain worn on your sleeve.

Dodgers
CINCINNATI, OHIO - MAY 19: Alex Verdugo #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers celebrates at second base after hitting a RBI double in the second inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park on May 19, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

If my team is going to lose – in any sport – it’s easier to accept when I know they care. For as long as we have watched sports, there’s always that tragic shot into the losing dugout when a season ends. There he sits, with that same sullen look on his face; the player who becomes the face of a collapse and the curtain falling on a season of possibility.

While I was too busy trying to collect my own emotions in the final moments of the Washington Nationals celebrating the NLDS game five win at Dodger Stadium, I didn’t see who this player was for the Dodgers.

Certainly, lost in the shuffle of managerial decisions and Kershaw home runs allowed; this player exists. Furthermore, it may surprise you.

Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that it was none other than outfielder Alex Verdugo. Indeed, this surprised me, and I definitely will file it away.

First, I noticed when the Dodgers had a few big moments in game five; Verdugo was out of the dugout and jumping with delight. It might not seem like much, but being a good teammate when you are on the sidelines for injury is a big deal to me.


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Then, learning that Verdugo sat there presumably as upset as anyone on the team about what might of been? Well, that’s moved him up a peg in my book. Furthermore, he had not played since August 4th. Unfortunately for the Dodgers – they could have used his bat in the lineup. In a rookie year that finished up with .294 and 12 home runs, Verdugo will be a key cog going forward.

And things like this should not go without notice. Obviously, he takes pride in being a Dodger even when he’s not able to play. It meant something to him for his teammates to advance.

Good on you, beyond your years Alex.

Written by Clint Evans

Clint lives in Ohio, and played collegiate baseball. He loves the Dodgers due to his first memories of Chavez Ravine when he was nine years old. The voice of Vin Scully has been a staple in his life since he was a kid. No amount of baseball talk is ever enough, and he wishes the regular season was year round. He has written about baseball online since 2007.

10 Comments

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  1. My biggest sorrow was for Kershaw. I hurt watching him go down that way. He’s too good of a human being to go through that, yet only someone like him would go through it with such class.
    Clayton, if you read this, know that I am oraying for you brother, God is not finished with you yet.

    • Way for Verdugo to set his reputation as an injury waiting to happen going forward. A 22 year old kid with back problems does not set a comfortable precedent. As far as I’m concerned, he let the team down.

    • I second that sentiment, Daniel. He was hung out to dry by manager Roberts, who should be the ex-manager if they have the guts to do the right thing. 2017, 2018, 2019- enough.

    • There is nothing good about this early exit, unless it leads to the dismissal of Dave Roberts. Now.

  2. We have traded HOF quality pitchers before. Sutton, Sutcliff, and Hershiser come to mind without doing any research. In the case of Kershaw, we know from history that velocity is not that important as location and a pitch arsenal. The latter concerns me when it comes to Kershaw. IMO, he needs to re-invent himself in light of his rapid decline in velocity. He needs to come up with one or two more pitches if he intends to remain an elite pitcher. As he currently sits, I look at him as a number 4 or 5 starter, with Buehler, Ryu, and even May ahead of him. Also, IMO, May was under-utilized in the post season. Furthermore, Gonsolin should have been on the roster instead of Stripling. In Kershaw’s current state, he is a candidate to be left off of future post season rosters. If Clayton cannot develop some new pitches to add to his current arsenal, then he is ripe to be traded. Don’t get me wrong, I love him as a human being and he surely will have a special place in Heaven, but baseball is not a philanthropic business, and like I said, we traded great pitchers before who have gone on to other teams and continued with their careers.

  3. Alex,
    You truly were a bright spot for the Dodgers this year. Here is to a complete recovery so you are ready in 2020.

  4. To all the Dodger faithful it makes me sick to my stomach that this organization doesnโ€™t care about their fans that makes them so wealthy. Dave Roberts used what he had and i believe he wanted to give Kershaw a chance to have a good record in a different role to compensate his terrible one as a starter, he believed in his player, he couldnโ€™t perform, the Dodgers are eliminated. Kelly was just terrible all season, Jansen is just as bad. This organization just never addresses the obvious.

  5. What is wrong with playing some small ball to move runners into scoring position ? The dodgers relied on the long ball all season ! That’s Roberts fault !

  6. Dodgers need to clean house!! Do you think they will obtain some quality pitching? They always obtain has bins ? …. How many total homeruns did the get in 2019 ?

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