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Dodgers: Clayton Kershaw Frustrations with Giants and Himself on Display

Kershaw showed his signature emotion on Friday night.

Dodgers

The Dodgers lost on Friday night to the rival San Francisco Giants by a score of 5-4. It was a tough loss to swallow as any one-run loss is. One Dodger in particular took the defeat the hardest: starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw. He allowed three earned runs, surrendered seven hits, and walked three in just four innings. He struck out six. It was not his best night.

We have become accustomed to the greatest pitcher of our generation showing emotion on and off the field. His energy is an integral part of the type of success he has enjoyed over the last decade with the Dodgers.

Kershaw Showing Emotion

The emotions were in full display on Friday night. Here is a video of Clayton Kershaw upset with being pulled, despite his uncharacteristic performance that necessitated it:

Kershaw went immediately into the dugout and let out a full kick before heading out into the clubhouse. You simply can’t blame him for being upset. Saying this was an uncharacteristic performance is quite frankly, an understatement. According to Michael J. Duarte of NBC Los Angeles, this was the first time Kershaw failed to go past five innings in a start in well over a full season:

Uncharacteristic Performance

Although Kershaw was unaware of what the final outcome of the game would be, he certainly cannot be too pleased of this:

The stats pulled by Duarte are well worth noting. They demonstrate the type of dominance that Kershaw is used to in himself and the type of dominance that the Dodgers expect out of him. Most pitchers go through three-loss stretches over the course of the season, but you just know Kershaw is not happy with himself and that he will continue to prove himself again, as he always does.

What to Expect

Kershaw is not the only ace on the staff to be struggling with Hyun-Jin Ryu recently beginning to look human.

Regardless of Friday’s performance, Kershaw remains one of the best pitchers in Major League Baseball. It has been that way for a long time and he does not appear to be slowing down. On the season, the 31-year-old southpaw has posted a solid 3.06 ERA, striking out 171 batters over 159 innings. Prior to his last three starts, vintage Kershaw was on display, where he posted a 2.77 ERA and 9.1 K/9.

Although Kershaw’s emotions were on full display, that is a good thing. Caring that much about his craft is something Kershaw’s career has prided itself on. You know he will always be there, every fifth day, ready to go. That will not be changing anytime soon.

Written by Daniel Preciado

My name is Daniel Preciado and I am 18 years old. I am a sophomore Sport Analytics major and Cognitive Science and Economics dual minor at Syracuse University. When I am not in New York, I live in Whittier, California --- not too far from Chavez Ravine. I am pretty old-school for being an analytics guy and I will always embrace debate. Also, Chase Utley did absolutely nothing wrong.

7 Comments

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  1. I don’y understand how it is that CK has never developed a change-up. I mean, we have pitching coaches all through the organization that should have been able to teach him. It would certainly make him more effective in my opinion as he gets older and his fastball is not what it once was. Has anyone ever read anything about this who could fill me in?

  2. From what I’ve read, he’s tried to add it a few times over the years in various forms. He just can never seem to get comfortable enough with one in Spring Training and bullpens to bring it into a game.

  3. get rid of Kershaw.. can’t anyone but me see he is done..hell most of the pictchers on the team are done… how many quality starts in last 25 games.. not very many..dodgres will win the west.. but not the national legue pennant…..they are Horrible with a captail H!!!

  4. Daniel Preciado above states “regardless of Friday’s performance”. Don’t know where you’ve been Daniel but Friday’s performance is the latest in the last 4 or 5 straight outings where he hasn’t pitched well. He’s become homer prone, walk prone and yes he doesn’t like his performance, yells at himself, but that isn’t solving anything.
    Don’t know the answer, but if Kershaw and Ryu along with Jansen can’t right themselves, then it may be a short playoffs.

    • Mike, you have stated the obvious, and you have done it well!!!! I totally agree with you. Our starting pitchers are our biggest worry IMHO. Kersh is showing years of wear and tear; Ryu appears to be tired; Maeda is lacking stamina; and Buehler might be over-worked. On top of that is our bats have gone cold. Obviously, Lux is not the answer at this time. Interestingly enough, 6 BP pitchers were used Saturday leaving me to wonder what will happen if today’s game dictates their presence. You are most correct when you state “it may be a short playoff”. Go Blue!!!!

    • Before Friday night’s performance, Clayton Kershaw had thrown 32 innings combined in his previous five starts. He only walked six batters and held a 3.38 ERA. He’s been fine.

  5. Kershaw is NOT done, Ken. Get your eyesight checked, then read his stats this year, and, above all, change your attitude.

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