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Dodgers: Clayton Kershaw Not Happy Seeing So Many No-Hitters Across MLB

Did the league screw up by changing the baseballs?



Major League Baseball had their 6th no-hitter thrown on Wednesday night. Corey Kluber blanked the Rangers and now the league is 1 no-no short of tying their all-time record for a season. In May. The Dodgers obviously don’t have one yet, but they have some thoughts. 

Players have talked briefly about the changed balls heading into 2021. MLB wanted to increase putting balls in play and discourage the all-or-nothing approach. That certainly change things up for the Dodgers. 

But Clayton Kershaw took a surprising stance following the Dodgers win on Wednesday. When asked about the no-hitters that have marked the first month and a half of the season, Kershaw said he didn’t think it was a good thing. 

Well, it’s not good, I’ll tell you that. I think whatever the intention was with the new ball, it really hasn’t done anything. …No-hitters are cool and I have all of the respect for Corey Kluber and Bum and all of those guys that have thrown no-hitters. But to have one happen every night is probably not good for the game. Fans want to see some hits. And I get that. 

When a pitcher is telling you that the league fell short in its plans, you know something is wrong. The Dodgrs pitcher is a guy who has been susceptible to the long ball in the past, but even he thinks MLB might have screwed this one up. 

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And the numbers don’t lie. Most offensive numbers across baseball are down, with a lot of them at an all-time low. It might not just be the change in the structure of the balls, but it sure didn’t help. Dodgers fans have certainty noticed a significant dip early on.

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Written by Brook Smith

Brook is the Senior Editor of Dodgers Nation, with several years of experience in sports journalism. He is an avid Dodgers and Lakers fan, and can be spotted fairly often at Dodger Stadium and Staples Center.

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  1. offensive numbers wouldn’t be so low if umpires would stop awarding strikes for pitches four inches off the plate.

  2. It’s obvious that the pitchers have adjusted to the launch angle crude, and the hitters haven’t. In the old days (6 years ago) pitchers were taught to keep the ball down, now they’ve been taught to keep their pitches up.

  3. I love seeing no-hitters, but I am not the typical fan. Throw a no-hitter this year Kersh and see how much fun you have!! Don’t let Trevor, Julio or Walker beat you to it!

  4. Well, if the league wants more hitting, then number one get rid of the shift. One of the worst things ever implemented. Secondly, Ron and Tim’s comments above hit it on the head. I’ve can’t remember pitches so far off the plate being called strikes like this year. I thought umpires were graded or is this part of the woke crowd now.

  5. Also, hitters need to rethink their approach. Trying to hit home runs causes many hitters to overswing. Their heads move and they open up too early. Way too many swings and misses. Putting the ball in play increases odds for a base hit and I love to see things like doubles and triples more than home runs sometimes. I also like to see defenders make plays…they are highly skilled and it’s fun to watch them make plays. When a batter strikes out only the pitcher and catcher are doing anything.

  6. most egregious strike zone extension tonite was the second inning called strikeout of Taylor; good job on Chris’ part not to go ballistic.

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