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Dodgers: Los Angeles Looking to Take Care of Stadium Staff

The Dodgers are looking at ways to help their staff get through these tough times.



During times like these, it’s hard to forget how many people are being hurt by not being able to work. That will be especially true for employees of the Dodgers. Major League Baseball came out today and almost guaranteed that the start date of April 9th is not feasible. In fact, many believe that baseball would be lucky to start in late June. 

After teams and players all around sports started making pledges and donations to their respective stadiums’ employees, we started to wonder when Los Angeles would do that same. According to Dodgers’ President Stan Kasten, there is a plan in the works.

We’re mindful of the problem. We’re looking at ways to help people get through these times. But we don’t have a plan just yet.

And a big problem it is indeed. The Dodgers have so many employees that will not be able to work in the coming months. These are employees that were relying on consistent work from March to October of this year. Now they are unsure that they will get to work at all this season. 

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Zion Williamson of the New Orleans Pelicans came forward on his own last week and pledged to take care of the workers at Smoothie King Arena. That’s a 19-year-old kid in his first year already taking big steps. He was just the latest NBA player to do so after several NBA players did something similar. The Dodgers have the highest capacity seating in all of Major League Baseball, so that will likely be a lot of employees out of work.

NEXT: Fear Looms Over the All Star Game in Los Angeles

Written by Brook Smith

Brook is the Senior Editor of Dodgers Nation, with several years of experience in sports journalism. He is an avid Dodgers and Lakers fan, and can be spotted fairly often at Dodger Stadium and Staples Center.

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  1. The Dodgers are the second wealthiest team in MLB. They should take care of their employees. “Taking care of” their employees won’t even dent the $8-billion (8,000 x 1,000,000) Time Warner paid them.

    • Redirect 1-5 percent of player salaries (for doing nothing) to stadium workers and their families. You could help hundreds of people get through this. Do you think the players union would go for that? H*ll no!

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