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Dodgers: Study Conducted to Track Astros Trash Can Banging in Sign Stealing

— and we thought Jomboy was the one.

The Houston Astros cheating scandal saw the rise of the Twitter sensation Jomboy, founder of Jomboy Media, for his work on identifying the ways the Astros went about their cheating operation. Jomboy went through countless hours of video to make a final determination that there was simply too much evidence to believe that the Astros didn’t cheat.

Now, another study has been conducted by Tony Adams (@adams_at) and he has since founded the website signstealingscandal.com to put all of his research in one place. The study is very extensive and proves the guilt of the Houston Astros in regard to this monumental cheating display.

Tony Adams is an Astros fan himself which makes this even more interesting. Adams logged every 2017 Houston Astros home game and recorded every banging of a trash can. Across 8,200 pitches, he recorder over 1,000 trash can bangs. That’s about 11 percent of every pitch that Astros hitters saw at their home ballpark. Wild.

From the research, we can conclude that the Houston Astros simply tested it out in the early part of 2017 and eventually saw that it was producing good results. They then decided to increase their usage of cheating on May 28.

Adams also included a graph relating total number of pitches and total bangs for different hitters. Most of the players who were excellent for the Astros in 2017 are above the trend line, meaning that they cheating at an above-average scale. Those hitters include Alex Bregman, George Springer, and the infamous Yuli Gurriel. Surprisingly, Jose Altuve had one of the lowest bang percentages.

From the next chart, it becomes obvious that some players entirely bought in and some did not:

More research will likely stem from this Adams study and it will only make the Astros look worse. The extensiveness of the cheating is simply egregious, yet unsurprising.

NEXT: Stan Kasten Very Interested in Hearing More Out of the Astros

Written by Daniel Preciado

My name is Daniel Preciado and I am 19 years old. I am a sophomore Sport Analytics major and Cognitive Science and Economics dual minor at Syracuse University. When I am not in New York, I live in Whittier, California --- not too far from Chavez Ravine. I am pretty old-school for being an analytics guy and I will always embrace debate. Also, Chase Utley did absolutely nothing wrong.

10 Comments

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  1. Altuve is clearly lower because who needs trash cans when your wearing a buzzer. This team better lead the league in hit by a pitch this year, if not the rest of the teams and pitchers should have nothing more to say.

  2. So the two players with the least bangs compared to a large amount of pitches are also the one accused of wearing wires…..hmmmm

  3. Perhaps Altuve was ahead of the curve and graduated beyond the trash can program to the buzzer program. His 2017 MVP should be vacated along with the Astros title.

  4. seems the next logical look at the data is outcomes vs bangs. Walks can probably be ignored, maybe as pitchers might try to do more than they can resulting in poorly thrown pitches or even injuries from overthrowing.

    I hadn’t even thought about the cascade of issues caused by the cheating. I have to say this sure pushes me toward what i already believe which is the penalties are not close to sufficient. More data correlation is needed and if a diehard fan can extract this what did MLB do in their “investigation”….perhaps there is an issue at the very top of MLB.

  5. I’m glad MLB cracked down in cheating in 2019. I’ve heard this analogy on how prevalent it was : The Astros might have been driving 90mph, but the rest of MLB was doing 85.

  6. Players that participated should return the ill gotten money they made, at least World Series money. What about the coaches and Admin?

  7. Major league baseball will not do anything else. I have several thoughts. Let’s make the playing field uneven for all ASTRO players that were involved in this black eye to America’s past time. When ASTRO pitcher’s pitch make them throw 4 strikes to record a strike out. Added wear on tear on their pitchers would tax their pitching staff the way it taxed opposing pitching staff for 2 years. If they are traded or sign somewhere else they get suspended for a certain amount of games before trade goes into affect. Plus not paid during that time. Second when their are batting only get 2 strikes. Make same as above if traded. Until players are made to pay for their actions this will continue. All coaches, managers suspended 2 years. Owner gets no revues for business. Major league baseball controls their business. Paying no management people and any profits is split amount all teams. The players need to know a disadvantage as well as possible monetary lost. Plus no draft picks for 2 years. Severe actions will stop the problem ans discourage future cheating.

  8. Remember the Black Sox scandal? Baseball needs another Judge Landis! Whether all players participated or not, the Astros” coaches and players were aware and their participation in the sign stealing was a team practice condoned by management. It’s sad that adults playing a sport, breaking the rules of play, and then smirking about it are examples of behavior being shown to our younger generation whom we expect to follow the same rules. When are these players going to stand up and take responsibity for their actions, instead of showing contempt by showing a prize obtained by cheating? Showing the ring as a reward for cheating signifies that the end does justify the means.

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