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MLB News: Owners Throw Down the Gauntlet in Wednesday CBA Meeting



The CBA negotiations on Wednesday got spicy. MLB reiterated to the players’ union that if a deal isn’t reached by February 28th, league owners are prepared to cancel, not postpone, regular season games. Meaning, players would not get paid for a full season. 

ESPN Jesse Rogers paraphrased what the MLBPA fired back with in appearance on SportsCenter. 

“Union sources are saying, ‘If we don’t get paid for 162, you’re not getting expanded playoffs.’ The rhetoric has gone up a notch. The urgency has taken hold here with just a few days left before the end of the month, they need to come to an agreement by Monday.”

That isn’t a small shot across the bow from the MLBPA to MLB. Expanding the playoffs would bring in a fresh round of television money for the league and owners. Increasing the number of postseason teams would double down on the league’s most proven, and most profitable, consumer product.

Rogers was then asked what actually got “done” on Wednesday besides the two sides threatening each other:

“Very little. The league offered a $10,000 raise to the minimum salary so starting in 2022, that minimum would be $640,000 and then go up $10,000 each year of the deal. That’s the only proposal that went either way and it was a slight movement towards the players. That’s it.”

Incremental movements are helpful, but time is running out to ensure a 162-game season this year. Jeff Passan highlighted the financial impasses on key topics. 

For that to happen, the two sides need to make big strides in finding coming ground in the next few days.

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6 Comments

  1. It’s impossible (for me at least) to overlook that we are talking about (in many cases) millionaires and billionaires fighting. The net result will likely be higher prices for fans making it an even more expensive proposition for a parent to take kids to a game, kids who are the best source of continuing love for the game by the next generation. I do have a lot of sympathy for stopping the manipulation that owners can do with careers as happened with Kris Bryant and for doing whatever can be done to stop teams from tanking. But for me, the greater need is fairness for those not in the majors. Years ago I was part of a team at our college that bargained for our raises – we were committed to the idea that we would not go forward without the same gains being made by our classified staff. I’d love to see that be a strong theme with the players – showing concern for those not blessed by being in the majors. I confess also that I don’t have a lot of sympathy for the idea that someone can work at a job for a few years and expect to never have to work again. Who among us writing here is in that situation? Increasingly, many find that they can’t retire at all. You can hardly blame players for not wanting to participate in an industry where only the owners make a fortune at their expense, but I can’t think that the answer is to be equally greedy when the tab is being paid for by the fans who love the game.

  2. Totally agree with Dana the fans pay with ticket prices avoid parking souvenirs I loved going to games growing up with my friends and the parents would sacrifice there day or weekend evening to take us and it was affordable for them now it’s ridiculous even cheap seats are not cheap I won’t go anymore there all spoiled babies who lost the love for the game cancel the season and I’ll watch minors anyday or college same with football I haven’t watched for years since the knee issue and there whining
    The fans have the control of everyone sticks together and don’t buy tickets just for one week or 2 they don’t want empty stands