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Dodgers: Steve Garvey, Don Mattingly, and Tommy John on 2020 Hall of Fame Ballot

Former Dodgers are up for Hall of Fame induction this year.

The Dodgers, being as historic of a franchise as they are, have a long list of Hall of Famers. From Sandy Koufax to Duke Snider and Jackie Robinson to Don Drysdale, the Dodgers have always embodied class and demonstrated immense talent.

This year, former Dodgers first baseman Steve Garvey, pitcher Tommy John, and former manager Don Mattingly are on the Hall of Fame ballot for 2020.

The 2020 Veterans’ Committee  will also acknowledge the Hall of Fame cases for greats like the Braves’ Dale Murphy and Yankees’ Thurman Munson. The Veterans’ Committee is a group of supreme voters who take second looks at the Hall of Fame cases of players who were ousted off of the ballot before induction.

Garvey, one of the most beloved Dodgers of all time, posted a lifetime .294 batting average and .775 on-base plus slugging percentage. He might get in with the Veterans’ Committee considering the Hall’s standards are getting lower. Garvey was fantastic in his day and in his prime, but he might not be entirely worthy of being in the Hall of Fame. If looking solely at his prime — from about 1974 to 1981 — Garvey was Hall of Fame worthy. He posted a .309 batting average and .819 OPS.

Tommy John’s name will always be a part of baseball and it wasn’t all because of his performance. Frank Jobe changed baseball with the famous operation on John and helped him continue greatness in his career. John threw a whopping 26 seasons — including 14 after the surgery — and posted a lifetime 3.34 ERA and 1.28 WHIP. Those are some fantastic numbers, especially when taking into account just how long he pitched,

Mattingly was the Dodgers’ manager earlier in the decade, but in his playing days, he was one of the best hitters in the game. Lifetime, Mattingly put up a .307 batting average and .830 OPS all with the New York Yankees. In his prime from 1984 to 1989, he batted .327 with a .902 OPS and 160 home runs. He was easily one of the best players in the 1980s and is deserving of induction, especially when looking at who is already in the Hall.

Written by Daniel Preciado

My name is Daniel Preciado and I am 18 years old. I am a sophomore Sport Analytics major and Cognitive Science and Economics dual minor at Syracuse University. When I am not in New York, I live in Whittier, California --- not too far from Chavez Ravine. I am pretty old-school for being an analytics guy and I will always embrace debate. Also, Chase Utley did absolutely nothing wrong.

7 Comments

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  1. Not only was the organization better back then but so were the fans. Watch old videos of it, I’ve never seen anything like it. LA just doesn’t have those kinds of people anymore

  2. In his last home game with the Dodgers in 1982, fans at Dodgers Stadium were chanting “Garvey! Garvey!” after his last at bat. Everyone knew Garvey was leaving as a free agent after the season because the Dodgers (Tommy Lasorda especially) had already announced Greg Brock will be Garvey’s replacement at first base. One of the saddest days at Dodgers Stadium. In addition to his career stats, Garvey was the 1974 NL MVP, he should be in the Hall of Fame.

  3. I’m ALL with ALL of YOU, (Garvey deserves to be in the “HALL”). It’s too bad that each Player has to wait an “Astonishing” amount of YEARS, before they are even eligible, to be considered.

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