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MLB News: MLBPA to Submit Counter Proposal to League on Monday Says MLB Expert



MLB is officially in the seventh full week of their lockout. MLB and the MLBPA met last week so the league could submit proposals regarding the “core-economics” of a new CBA. Predictably, the MLBPA was not impressed by MLB’s proposal. According to The Athletic’s Evan Drellich, the MLBPA to present their counter offer on Monday.

Per Jeff Passan of ESPN, the MLB’s proposed changes involved altering the arbitration process for players with at least two-years of service time, adjusting the draft lottery system, and awarding additional draft picks to teams that place a top 100 prospect on their Opening Day roster.

Those issues are seemingly not at the top of the list for the MLBPA. The players’ association is focused on increasing the CBT threshold and compensation for younger players.

Many experts have suggested that the current status of negotiations do not suggest that players will report to spring training on time next month. Pitchers and catchers typically arrive to spring training around Valentine’s Day.

The ongoing lockout is a culmination of the MLBPA’s mistrust of the MLB owners and their herald, commissioner Rob Manfred.

2020 sowed the seeds for the current lockout. Even in the face of a historic pandemic, the two sides famously struggled to agree to terms for a shortened season. Those contentious discussions only increased the players’ vitriol for MLB ownership and Manfred, experts believe.

It’s highly unlikely that the counter proposal from MLBPA will quickly lead to a new CBA, but it could be one step closer to starting the 2022 MLB season.

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2 Comments

  1. The players say they’re dealing with billionaires. Yet many MLB teams lose money. Player salaries should be somewhat dependent on the overall profitability of MLB teams, not the wealth of MLB owners. Most minor league teams are unprofitable, too, yet provide player development. Most minor leaguers never make it to the major leagues and MLB teams have to “eat” these costs. The Union seemingly doesn’t want to recognize this fact when it argues for a shorter duration to free agency. Why not keep the 6 years to free agency but pay players on the basis of their statistics. For example, tie salaries for all players based on Wins Above Replacement or other additional measures. Of course, the Union has never allowed accomplishments to set MLB pay.